Yes, a game can be too accessible

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by OldOnyxBones, Jun 19, 2014.

  1. I started writing a response to someone else in an other thread that basically turned in to “things probably wont change, we’d still probably be just as bad off if they did, everything is generally horrible, we’ll all die at some point, and... I should probably take my meds now...”

    Still, I did dig up an interesting video in an attempt to illustrate why it’s a bad thing that the modern gaming industry and the much older gaming industry are drawing more and more inspiration from each other. There’s a difference between making it easier for players to learn how mechanics work and interact with each other and purposefully lowering the skill ceiling and potential skill gap between players to the point that nearly everything can be learned in just a few minutes and there is little reason to seek improvement.

    I want more publishers to take fighting games more seriously and I don’t want the community to start drying up just as I’m thinking about getting involved with it again. However, I can’t help but worry about what things would start to look like if some of the stuff that publishers, producers, and even developers have been saying more and more about exploiting the market and consumers were to be applied to fighters as much as it has to more lucrative genres.

    Edit
    marginally shorter version / clarification:

    Shooters, Puzzle games, and MMOs in particular seem to have suffered from attempts to broaden their appeal by reducing the amount of things players need to learn or keep track of in order to play them. Games in older styles still get made, but seem to actually receive less funding and general success than when there was less money being thrown around because what was once a decent return on investment just isn’t enough now and people tend go where the other players are even if they aren’t ecstatic about the games themselves.

    Taken to its extreme, you get this
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2014

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